Topical Typography

Some interesting items have popped up in the last few days regarding typography and design. So here’s a quick round-up…

On Wired last week: A computer virus named Gauss that has been infecting Middle Eastern banks and businesses has been discovered to install a font named Palida Narrow on infected computers. It’s possible this is used to flag to the virus’s creators whether Gauss has been successfully deployed. I’m not a Middle Eastern bank, but this immediately made me check my installed fonts to see if Palida Narrow was among them! Found some nice ones I’d forgotten about too…

Via Fast Company: FF Chartwell is a ‘font’ that allows you to create graphs without spreadsheets – just by typing values separated by plus signs, and converting them to the font. Except it’s not really a font, and more of an ingenious manipulation of font technology. Click through for the explanation of how this actually works and some more striking graphs.

From the CR blog: As a testament to the easy recognition of their logos, Coca-Cola have confirmed they will be permanently using a cropped logo on cans of Diet Coke.

Another Fast Company pick: A small, but ‘statistically significant’ number of participants in an experiment conducted on nytimes.com found Baskerville to be a more trustable typeface than others, a phenomenon now nicknamed the ‘Baskerville Effect’.

And as a bonus link: Designer Jessica Jones over at How About Orange occasionally posts links to interesting free fonts – the latest for inspiration are Hagin Caps, Florence, and Mountain Retreat. It’s definitely worth perusing her back catalogue of font selections too – some of these leave me yearning for a design project, and are a great prompt to get on with the blog redesign!

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2 comments
  1. Aw thanks Mrs Verdant Green! I love the link between Baskerville & Sherlock Holmes – somehow had never made that connection! I’m also looking forward to season 3 but I’m not sure I’ll be quite so restrained when it comes to spoilers!

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